Compact disc

A well-constructed defense of the compact disc


I have a room next to my desk that I call the CD Vault. It’s crammed with maybe 10,000 compact discs from around 1986.

Although I hardly ever listen to any of them – I’m too busy rediscovering my vinyl collection – I never consider getting rid of this collection. This CBC Radio article explains why.

The death of David Bowie sparked a revelation for the publisher of Rolling Stone David Browne.

He rediscovered the value of compact discs over streaming.

“His death made me sad, but it also made me want to hear a lot of his music again. So I called one of my streaming services to hear the Moo album, ”he recalls.

This is when the streaming technology failed at Browne.

“The connection was going on and off, the volume was doing all kinds of weird stuff, and after a while I got fed up and said, ‘you know what, why don’t I just pull out one of my David Bowie CDs? ‘ », He explains.

No wifi? no problem

Open bridge. Insert the disc. Press PLAY.

No internet connection required. Not to mention the improvement in sound quality.

“It was easy. It sounded pretty glorious and I was like, ‘Why are CDs suddenly the worst thing mankind has ever invented?” Browne said.

No wifi? no problem

Open bridge. Insert the disc. Press PLAY.

No internet connection required. Not to mention the improvement in sound quality.

“It was easy. It sounded pretty glorious and I was like, ‘Why are CDs suddenly the worst thing ever invented by mankind?” Said Browne.

“It’s interesting that people hate them so much right now.”

The beauty of CDs, he explains, is the reliability of the physical disc.

“What if your hard drive crashes?” It has always been my fear. I’m always nervous about streaming services and things going on. “

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